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Limited Liability Company (LLC)

August 24, 2011

John Jastremski Presents:

 

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

 

Definition

A limited liability company (LLC) is a hybrid of a partnership and a corporation. An LLC can be treated like a corporation for liability purposes and can be taxed as a partnership (or even a sole proprietorship). When taxed as a partnership, income, losses, and other tax attributes pass through to the owners either pro rata or as allocated in the operating agreement (also referred to as a limited liability company agreement or a member control agreement, in which you prescribe, among other things, how the LLC is to operate and the relationship between members). Such an allocation of tax attributes is referred to as each member’s distributive share. The following discussion assumes that the LLC is taxed as a partnership.

Prerequisites 

  • None

Key Strengths

  • May be relatively simple and inexpensive to create and operate
  • No limit on the number and type of members
  • Profits taxed only once
  • Members can deduct losses and have them “specially allocated”
  • LLC can have centralized management
  • A member’s “basis” is increased by LLC liabilities
  • Members can “assign” their interests
  • LLC is flexible in sharing profits and control
  • Members can generally contribute appreciated property tax free
  • Liquidation of an LLC is generally tax free to members

Key Tradeoffs 

  • Members can typically “bind” the LLC
  • Life of LLC may be limited
  • LLC may be treated differently state to state
  • Members typically have the right to withdraw from the LLC
  • Fringe benefits are taxable to member-employee

Variations from State to State 

  • Because they are relatively new, LLCs may not be treated as uniformly as, perhaps, a partnership or corporation

How Difficult Is It to Implement? 

  • An LLC may be relatively simple and inexpensive to form and maintain

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of John Jastremski, Jeremy Keating, Erik J Larsen, Frank Esposito, Patrick Ray, Robert Welsch, Michael Reese, Brent Wolf, Andy Starostecki and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

 

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com,  access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

 

John Jastremski is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at http://www.theretirementgroup.com.

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