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Immediate vs. Deferred Annuities

June 12, 2011

John Jastremski Presents:

 

Immediate vs. Deferred Annuities

 

 

The terms immediate annuity and deferred annuity simply indicate when the distribution phase of the annuity begins. Both allow unlimited contributions, and both can provide, upon election, a continuous stream of payments for life.
Immediate annuities

Immediate annuities allow you to convert a lump sum of cash into an income stream. They differ from deferred annuities in that they do not have an accumulation period. They are funded with a single lump-sum payment rather than with a series of premium payments. An annuity option is chosen, and the distribution period begins within 12 months after the purchase.

Immediate annuities appeal to those investors who want an investment return that they cannot outlive. The distributions are considered partly a return of the original investment and partly earnings. You are taxed on the earnings portion only.

Immediate annuities are also used to provide benefits from a terminated defined benefit pension plan. In this situation, the accrued benefits under the plan are determined for each plan participant, and a single premium annuity may be purchased for each plan participant, with benefits usually starting at age 65.

Another common use is in the structured settlement of lawsuits. In these cases, the parties agree to pay a sum of money not as a lump sum but as a series of payments, often for the life of an injured party. A monthly amount to be paid is agreed to by the parties, and an annuity is purchased that provides that amount.
Deferred annuities

With a deferred annuity, you make a lump sum or a series of premium payments and defer the payout until some time in the future. This is known as the accumulation period. The earnings in the annuity are not subject to taxation until distributed.

Deferred annuities can provide an attractive investment supplement to IRAs and qualified pension plans such as 401(k) plans.

Note: Annuity guarantees are subject to the claims-paying ability of the annuity issuer. Annuity distributions made prior to age 59½ may be subject to a 10% federal tax penalty unless an exception applies.

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of John Jastremski, Jeremy Keating, Erik J Larsen, Frank Esposito, Patrick Ray, Robert Welsch, Michael Reese, Brent Wolf, Andy Starostecki and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com,  access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

John Jastremski is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at http://www.theretirementgroup.com.

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